45 Italian Alps Pictures to Make Nature Lovers Swoon

45 Pictures of the Italian Alps that will make nature lovers want to move to Italy. Plus personal Alps Life photos that show what living in the Italian Alps in Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall is like.

As a celebration of Paolo and my first year in our new home in the Italian Alps, I’m sharing my favorite photos of our daily life here in the Italian Alps aka Alps Life. For those new to ALOR.blog, Paolo and I live in Bardonecchia, Italy. While most of the pictures seen below are from our daily hikes in Bardonecchia, there are also photos of our favorite vacation spots in the Italian Alps including Lake Maggiore, Lake Orta, and the Dolomites.

Pictures of the Italian Alps

Bardonecchia is a small town of about 3,000 people north of Torino (Italy’s fourth-largest city) in the Italian Alps. Here’s Bardonecchia along with some of our wild neighbors as seen from our many hikes in the Italian Alps.

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Nearly every picture (with the exception of Lake Maggiore, Lake Orta & the Dolomites) was taken in a location reached by foot just outside our front door. Up here in the Alps, we mostly get where we’re going just like this. A smile on our faces, one foot in front of the other.

Steps outside my door ready to hike the Italian Alps
Steps outside my door ready to hike the Italian Alps.

One of the best things about living in the Italian Alps is that there are four truly distinct seasons. Spring, summer, fall, and winter each get an equal share of the calendar. Yet temperatures are surprisingly mild year long. Here’s a look at Alps Life hiking through the seasons with our personal photographs.

Summer in the Italian Alps

Summer days are typically pleasant with average temperatures between 20 degrees Celsius (68°F) and 25 degrees Celsius (77°F). Let’s put it this way. A year ago we finished our home renovation in the Italian Alps and did not install air conditioning. You don’t need it up here!

Our favorite summer happy hour in the Italian Alps? Hiking up to Ristorante Pian Del Sole for a drink with a view. Pretty sure those 200m (656 ft) of elevation burn any calories we consume!

  • Hiking Italian Alps ski trails
  • Charcuterie & Cheese plater in the Italian Alps
  • Happy Hour in the Italian Alps
  • Pictures of Italy Bardonecchia Hiking

On the opposite end of the spectrum is winter.

Winter in the Italian Alps

January is the coolest month in Bardonecchia with an average temperature of 6.7° C (44.06° F). For the most part, the town itself is shielded from brisk winter winds by the Alps themselves. Snow in the Italian Alps can vary year to year, but on average Bardonecchia gets 22cm (8 in) a week in the winter months. As winter comes around, Bardonecchia swells to about 30,000 people between part-timers and ski tourists. The volume of visitors shines a light on just how much fun living in the Italian Alps can be in winter.

  • Fresh Snow in the Italian Alps
  • Pictures of Italy winter hiking Italian Alps
  • Bardonecchia in Winter
  • Snowpicnic in the Italian Alps
  • Making a snow angel in the Italian Alps.
  • Making a Snowman in the Italian Alps in Winter.
  • Giant snowman in Bardonecchia, Italy
  • Catching snowflakes on your tongue
  • Pictures of Italy snowy Alps river
  • Pictures of Italy Italian Alps Pine Trees with Snow
  • Child sledding on snow mound in Bardonecchia, Italy

A quick video of how tranquil a winter hike in the Italian Alps can be!

Spring in the Italian Alps

Spring is when the Italian Alps are secretly at their best. Hiking is a pure delight with fields or wildflowers leading to mountain top hiking trails with views for miles. It’s like having a national park all to yourself. If you’ve ever dreamed of twirling around in the Alps like the opening scene in the Sound of Music, come visit the Italian Alps in Spring!

  • Pictures of Italy Hiking Italian Alps
  • Pictures of Italy Bardonecchia Hiking
  • Pictures of hiking the Italian Alps
  • Pictures of Italy Sestriere Italian Alps
  • Pictures of Italy Sestriere
  • Pictures of Italy Italian Alps flowers
  • Pictures of Italy Italian Alps in Spring

Fall in the Italian Alps

My birthday being in early November, fall has long been my favorite season. Yet I’ve honestly never seen a more beautiful fall than one in the Italian Alps. First, tree leaves turn yellow, gold, orange, and finally red. Then, fall colors slowly creep up the Italian Alps day by day until they finally take the pines. Daily walks feel like stepping into a Van Gogh.

Although mountain peaks in Bardonecchia can surpass 3,500 m the town itself sits at around 1,312 m (4,304 ft) making for some of the most amazing hikes in the Italian Alps. Nature lovers, just imagine walking out your front door at 1,302 m, and anyway you turn there are countless trailheads inviting you up the mountain. Take for example Poggi Tre Croci (point of three crosses pictured below) a local favorite that elevates to 2,115 m. The views are truly from the top of the world.

  • Poggi Tre Croci Hike
  • View from the top of Tre Croci hike
  • Tre Croci Hike Bardonecchia
  • Relaxing descent
  • Pictures of Italy Jafferau Battery Hike
  • The Jafferau Battery Hike
  • Golden leaves in the Italian Alps in Fall.
  • Cava di Marmo hike in Bardonecchia
  • Happy Hour at Campo Smith in Bardonecchia, Italy

What Living in the Italian Alps is Like

In a few words, Alps Life is about living a balanced, peaceful life surrounded by nature. It’s about having freedom of time to work out, work on projects, and play. Here’s a glimpse of a day in our lives this last winter in Bardonecchia. Enjoy! Better yet, come see for yourself.

References

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